Skew-whiff;
Emily is 18, lives in Sydney, Australia and likes
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biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

I GET THE PHOTO NOW….

biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

I GET THE PHOTO NOW….

(via throwitinasupernova)

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biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Cookie in a milk cup.

I DONT UNDERSTAND THIS PICTURE AT ALL

biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Cookie in a milk cup.

I DONT UNDERSTAND THIS PICTURE AT ALL

(via throwitinasupernova)

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dave-mech:

Goldenrod crab spider - Misumena vatia by ColinHuttonPhoto

dave-mech:

Goldenrod crab spider - Misumena vatia by ColinHuttonPhoto

rollership:

An end to plastic packaging poisoning us and all the life that feeds off the ocean is very very possible.

worclipThis Too Shall Pass (2012) by Tomorrow Machine

Independent packaging project for perishable goods:

Is it reasonable that it takes several years for a milk carton to decompose naturally, when the milk goes sour after a week? This Too Shall Pass is a series of food packaging were the packaging has the same short life-span as the foods they contain. The package and its content is working in symbiosis.

Smoothie package
Gel of the agar agar seaweed and water are the only components used to make this package. To open it you pick the top. The package will wither at the same speed as its content. It is made for drinks that have a short life span and needs to be refrigerated, fresh juice, smoothies and cream for example.

Rice Package
Package made of biodegradable beeswax. To open it you peel it like a fruit. The package is designed to contain dry goods, for example grains and rice.

Oil package
A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water. This package is made for oil-based food.

(via nowaitwhat)


littlelimpstiff14u2:

SHINTARO OHATA

Born in Hiroshima, 1975.
Shintaro Ohata is an artist who depicts little things in everyday life like scenes of a movie and captures all sorts of light in his work with a unique touch: convenience stores at night, city roads on rainy day and fast-food shops at dawn etc. His paintings show us ordinary sceneries as dramas. He is also known for his characteristic style; placing sculptures in front of paintings, and shows them as one work, a combination of 2-D and 3-D world.

Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata (previously) currently has two new sculptural paintings on view at Mizuma Gallery in Singapore. Ohata places vibrantly painted figurative sculptures in the foreground of similarly styled paintings that when viewed directly appear to be a single artwork. In some sense it appears as though the figures have broken free from the canvas. These artworks, along with several of his other paintings, join works by Yoddogawa Technique, Enpei Ito, Osamu Watanabe, and Akira Yoshida, for the Sweet Paradox show that runs through August 10th

Txt Via Colossal

(via leah-leela)


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de-preciated:

Rhone Glacier, Belvédère (by akarakoc)
Rhone Glacier, Belvédère

de-preciated:

Rhone Glacier, Belvédère (by akarakoc)

Rhone Glacier, Belvédère

(via thisisthebbchomeservice)

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(Source: whynotlivefast, via bad-friends)

kittehkats:

Cats at War

Historical photos of cats and kittens in war settings.  A little tenderness amongst the horror.

BTW… photograph 7 is of Marine Sergeant Frank Praytor.  He is feeding the kitten with canned milk using a medical dropper.

The photo was taken in Korea in 1953. The little kitten named Miss Hap was only two weeks old. She became an orphan because of war and was rescued by Marine Sergeant Frank Praytor. He adopted the kitten after the mother cat died from the war. According to the marine, the name was derived “because she was born at the wrong place at the wrong time.”

U.S. Naval Institute

(via thisisthebbchomeservice)


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libutron:

whatthefauna:

The sequined (or mirror) spider has silvery patches covering its abdomen. Because the speckles reflect and scatter light, they may make the spider harder for predators to see. Amazingly, the patches with change in size depending on the spider’s level of agitation.
Image credit: Andrew Ker

Thwaitesia nigronodosa (Theridiidae)

libutron:

whatthefauna:

The sequined (or mirror) spider has silvery patches covering its abdomen. Because the speckles reflect and scatter light, they may make the spider harder for predators to see. Amazingly, the patches with change in size depending on the spider’s level of agitation.

Image credit: Andrew Ker

Thwaitesia nigronodosa (Theridiidae)

(via thisisthebbchomeservice)

victoriousvocabulary:

SONNENUNTERGANG

[noun]

German: sunset; sundown; setting of the sun.

[Thomas Moran]

(via thisisthebbchomeservice)


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(via thisisthebbchomeservice)

[1/10] favorite tv shows → Luther

(Source: iincendie, via unreasonablyme)


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encriers:

Vampire Weekend for Standard Magazine, ph. Linus Ricard

encriers:

Vampire Weekend for Standard Magazine, ph. Linus Ricard

(via dragonsgorawr)

(Source: buffyannesummers, via themalfoymissus)


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sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

(via itsdarkasdicks)